Reviews

  • The End of the Tour | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    The Admiration Game: Ponsoldt’s Moving Homage to Artist and Artistry Following the critical successes of 2012’s Smashed and 2013’s The Spectacular Now, director James Ponsoldt...

  • What Happened, Miss Simone? | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Writing on the Wall: Garbus Offers Compressed Portrait of Soul-Gospel-Jazz Queen Nina Simone, a prominent musician-turned-civil-rights-activist, left behind a legacy in which the latter part...

  • The Russian Woodpecker | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Signals Over The Air: First Time Filmmaker Chad Gracia Sees Russian Conspiracy Theory Transform Into Truth At the dark heart of director Chad Gracia’s messy,...

  • 2015 Sundance Trading Card Series: #10. Sean Baker (Tangerine)

    Eric Lavallee: Name me three of your favorite “2014 discoveries”… Sean Baker: 1) Ruben Östlund – After being blown away by Force Majeure, I made...

  • The Royal Road | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Jenni Olson begins The Royal Road, her latest emotional excavation of Hollywood nostalgia via Benning-esque 16mm landscape portraiture, by self-referentially quoting Michel Chion on the...

  • The Summer of Sangaile | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    The Wind Beneath Her Wings: Kavaite’s Sapphic Sophomore Sighs Sophomore is an adjective that serves as a pun to describe Alante Kavaite’s latest film, The...

  • Killers | Review

    The Killers Inside Me: The Mo Bros’ International Serial Spree Directing duo Kimo Stamboel and Timo Tjahjanto, better known as the Mo Brothers, team for the slice...

  • Song One | Review

    Title Track: Barker-Froyland’s Cloying Debut Plays Familiar Tune “Sad song at night, hipster’s delight” should be the opening line in Kate Barker-Froyland’s mournful, musically inclined...

  • Cake | Review

    Let Them Have It: Barnz Banks on Adept Aniston Grief is a prickly emotion to convey within the confines of the indie American melodrama, a...

  • The Duke of Burgundy | Review

    The Body and the Whip: Strickland’s Sublime Homage to Erotic Cinema Beginning like something that should have been called Exploits of a Chambermaid, replete with...

  • Black Sea | Review

    Lower Depths: MacDonald’s Latest a Tense Deep Sea Treasure Hunt While it’s being treated to a December release in his native UK, director Kevin MacDonald’s...

  • The Humbling | Review

    Or The Unexpected Convenience of Sexism: Levinson’s Perplexing but Deviously Funny Stab at Roth Decades passed between initial adaptations of novelist Philip Roth’s novels (1969’s...

  • R100 | Review

    Joy Pain Club: Matsumoto’s Latest Insistent Weirdness Uneven After his delightful if belabored 2007 debut Big Man Japan put him on the map, director Hitoshi...

  • Little Accidents | Review

    Casualties of Class War: Colangelo’s Well Performed, Soporific Debut The directorial debut of Sara Colangelo, Little Accidents, finds a filmmaker afforded the possibility to expand...

  • Blackhat | Review

    Black in the Saddle: Mann’s Cyber Thriller Forgets Thrills Though clearly uninterested in providing conventional thrills with his first theatrical release in six years, director...

  • Black November | Review

    Sweet, Oily November: Amata’s Agonizingly Clunky Issue Film Nigerian filmmaker Jeta Amata’s fourth feature Black November sports a slew of notable American faces in this...

  • Son of a Gun | Review

    Gunsmoke: Avery’s Able-bodied Debut Dulled by Familiar Tropes The less familiar you are with the dramatic crime genre, perhaps the more engaged you’ll be with...

  • Match | Review

    Stewart’s Eccentricity Barely Keeps “Match” Lit Groomed and primmed ballet dancers create arches and points which are lauded and corrected by their instructor, kept sharp...

  • Involuntary | Review

    Cold Cuts: Östlund Examines Behavior Unawares in Astute Sophomore Feature While Ruben Östlund’s 2004 feature debut The Guitar Mongoloid first played with examinations of human...

  • Human Capital | Review

    For What It’s Worth: Virzi’s Leftist Neo-Noir a Capitalistic Parable Receiving its North American premiere last spring at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival, where it...