2014 Cannes Film Festival: Ryan Gosling’s Lost River

lost-river-cannes

In all my years attending the festival, the world premieres that take place in the mythic, film history-rich lieus such as the Lumiere (Main Comp), the Debussy (Un Certain Regard) and oft-renamed setting where they house Directors’ Fortnight (JWMariott) are met with a standard, ten minute standing ovation when the credits role. With the filmmaker team present, it would simply be bad form to pass vocal judgement — the hissing and booing we often hear about are more often than not during the early morning press screenings.

Landing a coveted spot in the Un Certain Regard section, a section that protects “high art” or the “experimental” type, Lost River was swarmed with immense curiosity. Could working with the likes of a Derek Cianfrance or Nicolas Winding Refn pass on some filmmaker skill genes? My first thought at the fiery credit roll was: is this is how actor-turned-first-time-director Johnny Depp’s The Brave (1997) might have been received way back in the Cannes time machine? Here is premiere night for ya.

 

Eric Lavallée is the founder, editor-in-chief and film critic at IONCINEMA.com (founded in 2000). Eric splits his time between his home base in Montreal, NYC, and is a regular at Sundance, Cannes and TIFF. He has a BFA in Film Studies at the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema. In 2013 he served as a Narrative Competition Jury Member at the SXSW Film Festival. Top Films From Contemporary Film Auteurs: Almodóvar (Talk to Her), Coen Bros. (Fargo), Dardennes (La Promesse), Haneke (Caché), Hsiao-Hsien (Three Times), Kar-wai (In the Mood for Love), Kiarostami (Taste of Cherry), Lynch (Mulholland Dr.), Tarantino (Pulp Fiction), Van Sant (My Own Private Idaho), von Trier (Breaking the Waves)