All posts tagged "Foreign Film Review"

  • The Russian Woodpecker | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Signals Over The Air: First Time Filmmaker Chad Gracia Sees Russian Conspiracy Theory Transform Into Truth At the dark heart of director Chad Gracia’s messy,...

  • The Summer of Sangaile | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    The Wind Beneath Her Wings: Kavaite’s Sapphic Sophomore Sighs Sophomore is an adjective that serves as a pun to describe Alante Kavaite’s latest film, The...

  • Killers | Review

    The Killers Inside Me: The Mo Bros’ International Serial Spree Directing duo Kimo Stamboel and Timo Tjahjanto, better known as the Mo Brothers, team for the slice...

  • The Duke of Burgundy | Review

    The Body and the Whip: Strickland’s Sublime Homage to Erotic Cinema Beginning like something that should have been called Exploits of a Chambermaid, replete with...

  • Black Sea | Review

    Lower Depths: MacDonald’s Latest a Tense Deep Sea Treasure Hunt While it’s being treated to a December release in his native UK, director Kevin MacDonald’s...

  • R100 | Review

    Joy Pain Club: Matsumoto’s Latest Insistent Weirdness Uneven After his delightful if belabored 2007 debut Big Man Japan put him on the map, director Hitoshi...

  • Son of a Gun | Review

    Gunsmoke: Avery’s Able-bodied Debut Dulled by Familiar Tropes The less familiar you are with the dramatic crime genre, perhaps the more engaged you’ll be with...

  • Involuntary | Review

    Cold Cuts: Östlund Examines Behavior Unawares in Astute Sophomore Feature While Ruben Östlund’s 2004 feature debut The Guitar Mongoloid first played with examinations of human...

  • Human Capital | Review

    For What It’s Worth: Virzi’s Leftist Neo-Noir a Capitalistic Parable Receiving its North American premiere last spring at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival, where it...

  • The Guitar Mongoloid | Review

    People Are Strange: Östlund’s Debut a Curio Set of Characters Premiering domestically in late 2004 before snagging festival play at a handful of festivals, including...

  • It’s All So Quiet | Review

    I Need a Lover with a Farmhand: Leopold’s Understated Portrait of Desire Deferred Loneliness and resentment are the dueling, omnipresent emotions on screen in virtually...

  • Fidelio: Alice’s Journey | Palm Springs International Film Festival Review

    Go Ask Alice: Borleteau’s Debut Examines Desire, Gender, and Maturity Sure to be described as “European,” seemingly in the sense that it relays a familiar...

  • The Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death | Review

    Blitzkrieg Bop: Harper’s Demurely Serviceable Horror Sequel Revels in Cheap Thrills Director James Watkins scored a sleeper hit with his 2012 sophomore film, The Woman...

  • Li’l Quinquin | Review

    Life of Quinquin: Dumont’s Foray into Miniseries Format Filled with His Brand of Peculiar Humor Provocative auteur Bruno Dumont lets loose his comedic side with...

  • Rec 4: Apocalypse | Review

    Wreckollect: Balaguero Returns to Famed Franchise for Gasping Final Chapter The good news is that we’ve probably seen the last creative juice finally squeezed out...

  • Tip Top | Review

    Vive La France!: Bozon Returns With a Strangeness Actor turned director Serge Bozon is the most visible member of a small coterie of filmmakers operating...

  • The Japanese Dog | Review

    Echoes of Autumn: Jurgiu’s Understated Debut Tender, Unmemorable Inevitably, it’s difficult to consider the merits of Romanian director Tudor Cristian Jurgiu’s directorial debut The Japanese...

  • Song of the Sea | Review

    Of Myth and Men: Moore Dons Skin of the Irish Selkies To Craft Stunning Children’s Tale of Family Heritage You can probably count the number...

  • Leviathan | Review

    On the Waterfront: Zvyagintsev’s Sprawling Opus of a Modern, Devouring Regime Back with his fourth feature, Leviathan, Russian auteur Andrey Zvyagintsev succeeds in cinematic sublimity...

  • Zero Motivation | Review #2

    Band of Girls: Lavie’s Acerbic, Confident Debut Exacerbated ennui is explored to comedic effect in Tayla Lavie’s striking directorial debut, Zero Motivation, which explores life...

  • Zero Motivation | Review

    A “Staple” Female-centric Portrait: Lavie Adds Dark Charm to Bureaucratic Military Milieu With a subject so entrenched with weight and political correctness, there seems to...

  • Video Interview: Krzysztof Zanussi (Foreign Body) – 2014 Toronto Int. Film Festival

    We sat down with Polish director Krzysztof Zanussi at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival after the premiere of his new film, Foreign Body. Zanussi,...

  • Pioneer | Review

    Oil!: Skjoldbjaerg’s Latest an Icy Conspiracy Thriller Norwegian director Erik Skjoldbjaerg has remained a hard director to peg ever since his celebrated 1997 debut, Insomnia,...

  • Miss Julie | Review

    Touch of Class: Ullmann’s Update of Classic Text Ultimately Lifeless There are a scant few equals to the texts of playwright August Strindberg’s, his 1888...

  • Wild | Review

    Peaks and Vallée: Witherspoon Eats, Prays, Hikes When Cheryl Strayed’s memoir was released in 2012, the climate for gender politics was different. The book’s popularity soared...