All posts tagged "Foreign Film Review"

  • Two Men in Town | Review

    The Town That Dreaded Showdown: Bouchareb Returns to New Mexican Landscape with Mixed Results French director Rachid Bouchareb’s long celebrated filmography has garnered two of...

  • October Gale | Review

    Perfect Storm: Mystery Tinged Romance from Nadda Gets Blown Away in Gusts There’s much to admire in Montreal-born director Ruba Nadda’s latest film, October Gale,...

  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | Review

    The First Best Loser: Madden’s Wholly Unnecessary Sequel an Exercise in Nothingness Pandering is the word that best describes the tone of The Second Best...

  • Maps to the Stars | Review

    What’s the Matter with Havana?: Cronenberg’s L.A. Story a Hot Mess of Tangled Ideas Couched within its episodic instances of harpooning Hollywood stereotypes, there is...

  • Queen and Country | Review

    Tour of Duty: Boorman Returns to Autobiographical Elements Now at 82 years of age, British auteur John Boorman returns with Queen and Country his first...

  • Cloro | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    From Twirls to Breaststrokes: Sanfelice’s Debut Retains Rhythm but Keeps Distance Utilizing the seldomly spotlighted sport of synchronized swimming as the backdrop, Cloro serves as...

  • Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem | Review

    Horse & Carriage: The Elkabetzs’ Kafkaesque Interpretation of So-Called Sacred Institution The third film in a trilogy examining the relationship between a husband and wife...

  • What We Do in the Shadows | Review

    Friends Forever: Clement & Waititi’s Pleasantly Charming Vampiric Mock-Doc That immortal cinematic archetype, the vampire, has once again been commandeered into the periphery of independent...

  • The Hallow | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Hollow’s Eve: Hardy’s Creature Feature Debut Has Superficial Roots It was announced that Irish director Corin Hardy would be heading up The Crow reboot for...

  • Les Gazelles | 2015 My French Film Festival Review

    Girls Just Wanna Have: Achache’s Breezy Sophomore Feature After adapting Muriel Barbery’s celebrated novel The Hedgehog for her 2009 debut, director Mona Achache returns with...

  • Chuck Norris vs Communism | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    VHS Revolution: Calugareanu Shoots For Docu-Thrills Much of the time, American imperialism is a culture destroying force that denigrates through sheer, unwieldy bloat, but in the case...

  • City of Gold | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Eating One’s Way To Enlightenment: Gabbert Follows Gold Down A Rabbit-Hole Of Crucial Cultural Cuisine Everyone in Los Angeles knows that Jonathan Gold is the...

  • The Russian Woodpecker | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Signals Over The Air: First Time Filmmaker Chad Gracia Sees Russian Conspiracy Theory Transform Into Truth At the dark heart of director Chad Gracia’s messy,...

  • The Summer of Sangaile | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    The Wind Beneath Her Wings: Kavaite’s Sapphic Sophomore Sighs Sophomore is an adjective that serves as a pun to describe Alante Kavaite’s latest film, The...

  • Killers | Review

    The Killers Inside Me: The Mo Bros’ International Serial Spree Directing duo Kimo Stamboel and Timo Tjahjanto, better known as the Mo Brothers, team for the slice...

  • The Duke of Burgundy | Review

    The Body and the Whip: Strickland’s Sublime Homage to Erotic Cinema Beginning like something that should have been called Exploits of a Chambermaid, replete with...

  • Black Sea | Review

    Lower Depths: MacDonald’s Latest a Tense Deep Sea Treasure Hunt While it’s being treated to a December release in his native UK, director Kevin MacDonald’s...

  • R100 | Review

    Joy Pain Club: Matsumoto’s Latest Insistent Weirdness Uneven After his delightful if belabored 2007 debut Big Man Japan put him on the map, director Hitoshi...

  • Son of a Gun | Review

    Gunsmoke: Avery’s Able-bodied Debut Dulled by Familiar Tropes The less familiar you are with the dramatic crime genre, perhaps the more engaged you’ll be with...

  • Involuntary | Review

    Cold Cuts: Östlund Examines Behavior Unawares in Astute Sophomore Feature While Ruben Östlund’s 2004 feature debut The Guitar Mongoloid first played with examinations of human...

  • Human Capital | Review

    For What It’s Worth: Virzi’s Leftist Neo-Noir a Capitalistic Parable Receiving its North American premiere last spring at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival, where it...

  • The Guitar Mongoloid | Review

    People Are Strange: Östlund’s Debut a Curio Set of Characters Premiering domestically in late 2004 before snagging festival play at a handful of festivals, including...

  • It’s All So Quiet | Review

    I Need a Lover with a Farmhand: Leopold’s Understated Portrait of Desire Deferred Loneliness and resentment are the dueling, omnipresent emotions on screen in virtually...

  • Fidelio: Alice’s Journey | Palm Springs International Film Festival Review

    Go Ask Alice: Borleteau’s Debut Examines Desire, Gender, and Maturity Sure to be described as “European,” seemingly in the sense that it relays a familiar...

  • The Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death | Review

    Blitzkrieg Bop: Harper’s Demurely Serviceable Horror Sequel Revels in Cheap Thrills Director James Watkins scored a sleeper hit with his 2012 sophomore film, The Woman...