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All posts tagged "Foreign Film Review"

  • Phoenix | Review

    Return From the Ashes: Petzold’s Compelling Resurrection of WWII Aftermath At the head of the cinematic movement referred to as the Berlin School of filmmaking...

  • Cesar and Rosalie (1972) | Review

    Love’s Connections: Sautet’s Frustrating, Savvy Love Story Out of the many representations of cinematic emotional complexities French filmmakers master over most is the messy actuality...

  • Max and the Junkmen (1971) | Review

    Crime and Punishment: Sautet’s Enthralling Policier an Obscure Neo-Noir Following the international acclaim of his 1970 film The Things of Life, Claude Sautet re-teamed with...

  • Nelly & Monsieur Arnaud (1995) | Review

    Lonely Hearts: Sautet’s Elegant Final Film on Passionate Restraint Winning Best Director as well as Best Actor for Michel Serrault at the 1995 Cesars, Nelly...

  • A Hard Day | Review

    Long Day’s Journey: Seong-hoon Reaches Amoral High Ground with Spry Action Flick If anything, South Korean director Kim Seong-hoon’s sophomore film A Hard Day certainly...

  • Court | Review

    Legal Ease: Tamhane’s Frustrating, Numbing Portrait of India’s Legal System Director Chaitanya Tamhane won Best Film in the Horizons program at the 2014 Venice Film...

  • Catch Me Daddy | Review

    Family Matters: Wolfe’s Unsettling Debut a Thriller with a Mean Streak Premiering in the Directors’ Fortnight sidebar at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, director Daniel...

  • Mr. Holmes | Review

    Unsolved Mysteries: Condon Recreates the Last Days of Sherlock Holmes Director Bill Condon reunites with elements from several of his most critically acclaimed titles for...

  • Eisenstein in Guanajuato | 2015 Outfest Los Angeles LGBT Film Festival Review

    Once Upon a Time in Mexico: Greenaway’s Homage an Inspired Provocation Erotically charged and artfully crafted, Eisenstein in Guanajuato is the first of two titles devoted...

  • Alleluia | Review

    In the Mood For Love: Du Welz Returns With Gloriously Dark Rendering of Insatiable Passion His first film since 2008’s underappreciated Vinyan, Belgian director Fabrice...

  • Strangerland | Review

    Cry in the Dark: Farrant’s Debut an Unnerving Exploration of Carnal Knowledge Recent critically acclaimed imports from Australia tend to glorify more aggressive genre trends,...

  • 10,000 KM | Review

    Going the Distance: Marques-Marcet Explores the Strain of Separation An exploration of the effects an extended period of long distance has on the stability of...

  • Big Game | Review

    Rules of the Game: Helander’s Schlocky English Language Debut Even though the film seems perfectly well aware of its own silliness as it recapitulates formulaic...

  • The Little Death | Review

    Lust, Actually: Lawson’s Sexually Charged Debut Struggles with What Women Want Taking home the audience prize at the 2015 SXSW Film Festival, Australian director Josh...

  • Eden | Review

    In The Garden Of Garage: Hansen-Løve Recounts Brother’s Coming of Age During the Rise of House Music Thanks to her brother Sven’s involvement in the popularization...

  • The Tribe | Review

    Get the Picture: Slaboshpitsky’s Excellent, Memorably Pronounced Debut In a sea of derivative cinematic components, wholly original ideas seem few and far between. In a...

  • Madame Bovary | Review

    Good Time Gal: Barthes’ Sensible Remake of Flaubert’s Classic Novel Few literary protagonists have reached the heights of notability as the infamous Madame Bovary, from...

  • Set Fire to the Stars | Review

    Suffer the First Vision: Goddard’s Debut Anchored in Episode of Literary Distress Doomed Welsh poet Dylan Thomas gets a contemporary biopic treatment in Set Fire...

  • Chagall-Malevich | Review

    Painter Man: Mitta’s Return to Filmmaking a Lofty, Honeycombed History Lesson Ungainly and distractingly saccharine, Russian auteur Aleksandr Mitta returns with Chagall-Malevich, a whimsical biopic...

  • Hungry Hearts | Review

    Heart of Glass: Costanzo’s Uncomfortable, Emotional Glance at Madness Must every cinematic portrait of mental illness be ‘illuminating?’ Your answer to that question may gauge...

  • A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence | Review

    Familiar Tune: Andersson Completes Trilogy With Enjoyable, Familiar Chapter Prolific Swedish filmmaker Roy Andersson tends to work infrequently, taking years, if not decades, between film...

  • Alias Maria | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    Guerillas in the Mist: Rugeles Explores the Jungles in Labored Sophomore Effort An intriguing perspective within a terrifying environment initially makes for a compelling scenario...

  • Tu dors Nicole | Review

    Sleep, Perchance to Dream: Lafleur’s Eccentric Portrait of One Hazy Summer Quebecois filmmaker Stephane Lafleur’s third film, Tu dors Nicole (“You’re Sleeping Nicole) unfolds over...

  • The Other Side | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    Beasts of the Southern Wild: Minervini Continues Fascination with American Rural Dysfunction One can’t help but recall the refreshing yet uncomfortably toxic memories of Harmony...

  • Güeros | Review

    Like it’s 1999: Ruizpalacios’ Sprightly Directorial Debut There’s something in the air of Alonso Ruizpalacios’ directorial debut, Güeros, a beautifully shot period piece examining a...