All posts tagged "Foreign Film Review"

  • A Wolf at the Door | Review

    Suffer the Children: Coimbra’s Dark Debut is an Affair to Remember Kidnapping and abduction often make for unsettling cinematic subjects, especially when involving small children....

  • La Sapienza | Review #2

    Spaces Between: Green’s Controlled, Heavily Stylized Metaphor Eugène Green is an American born filmmaker who has been steadily making foreign films over the past decade...

  • La Sapienza | Review #1

    Style-Over-Substance in a Fancy Baroque Package French “artiste” Eugène Green’s latest work is further evidence that his overriding career trajectory of indulgent reminiscence, has a deliberately...

  • Amour Fou | Review

    Love Fool: Hausner’s Latest an Exquisitely Shot, Humorous Exploration of Love and Death With her fourth feature film, Amour Fou, Austrian director Jessica Hausner reveals...

  • Portrait of the Artist | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

    On My Skin: Barraud Explores the Essence of Monstrosity There are moments within Antoine Barraud’s sophomore feature Portrait of the Artist that tend to feel...

  • Metamorphosis | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

    Europa, Europa: Honore’s Eloquently Updates Ovid for Masterful, Playful Adaptation There really isn’t a modern counterpart (even if Francois Ozon might come close) for the...

  • Love at First Fight | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

    Once Bitten: Cailley’s Unique Exploration of Summer Lovin’ Since premiering at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, where it picked up the FIPRESCI Prize in the...

  • 3 Hearts | Review

    Heart to Heart to Heart: Jacquot’s Romantic Drama Can’t Cover Every Angle Despite sporting the likes of Charlotte Gainsbourg and Catherine Deneuve, 3 Hearts, the...

  • The Connection | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

    Le Chapitre Français: Jimenez’s Satisfactory Take on Famed Drug Smuggling Operation Within the glut of cinematic dramas and thrillers contending with drug smuggling operations and...

  • Of Horses and Men | Review

    A Horse is a Horse, Of Course: Erlingsson’s Debut Visually Striking, Episodic Iceland’s 2013 submission for Best Foreign Language film was the directorial debut of Benedikt...

  • Eat Your Bones | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

    Family Matters: Hue’s Continued Fascination With Yenish Community Director Jean-Charles Hue continues with the exploration of the Yenich community, a nomadic group of people that...

  • The Mafia Only Kills in Summer | Review

    Il Sciocco: Pif’s Mafia Tinged Broad Comedy Revels in Pedestrian Frivolity Apparently partially based on a true story, for whatever that statement is worth, The...

  • These Final Hours | Review

    The Final Countdown: Hilditch Fails to Impress with Aussie Apocalypse Australian director Zak Hilditch tackles the swiftly encroaching apocalypse in his latest effort, These Final...

  • Two Men in Town | Review

    The Town That Dreaded Showdown: Bouchareb Returns to New Mexican Landscape with Mixed Results French director Rachid Bouchareb’s long celebrated filmography has garnered two of...

  • October Gale | Review

    Perfect Storm: Mystery Tinged Romance from Nadda Gets Blown Away in Gusts There’s much to admire in Montreal-born director Ruba Nadda’s latest film, October Gale,...

  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | Review

    The First Best Loser: Madden’s Wholly Unnecessary Sequel an Exercise in Nothingness Pandering is the word that best describes the tone of The Second Best...

  • Maps to the Stars | Review

    What’s the Matter with Havana?: Cronenberg’s L.A. Story a Hot Mess of Tangled Ideas Couched within its episodic instances of harpooning Hollywood stereotypes, there is...

  • Queen and Country | Review

    Tour of Duty: Boorman Returns to Autobiographical Elements Now at 82 years of age, British auteur John Boorman returns with Queen and Country his first...

  • Cloro | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    From Twirls to Breaststrokes: Sanfelice’s Debut Retains Rhythm but Keeps Distance Utilizing the seldomly spotlighted sport of synchronized swimming as the backdrop, Cloro serves as...

  • Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem | Review

    Horse & Carriage: The Elkabetzs’ Kafkaesque Interpretation of So-Called Sacred Institution The third film in a trilogy examining the relationship between a husband and wife...

  • What We Do in the Shadows | Review

    Friends Forever: Clement & Waititi’s Pleasantly Charming Vampiric Mock-Doc That immortal cinematic archetype, the vampire, has once again been commandeered into the periphery of independent...

  • The Hallow | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Hollow’s Eve: Hardy’s Creature Feature Debut Has Superficial Roots It was announced that Irish director Corin Hardy would be heading up The Crow reboot for...

  • Les Gazelles | 2015 My French Film Festival Review

    Girls Just Wanna Have: Achache’s Breezy Sophomore Feature After adapting Muriel Barbery’s celebrated novel The Hedgehog for her 2009 debut, director Mona Achache returns with...

  • Chuck Norris vs Communism | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    VHS Revolution: Calugareanu Shoots For Docu-Thrills Much of the time, American imperialism is a culture destroying force that denigrates through sheer, unwieldy bloat, but in the case...

  • City of Gold | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

    Eating One’s Way To Enlightenment: Gabbert Follows Gold Down A Rabbit-Hole Of Crucial Cultural Cuisine Everyone in Los Angeles knows that Jonathan Gold is the...