All posts tagged "U.S. Indie Film Review"

  • Don’t Think Twice | Review

    Funnier People: Birbiglia’s Sincere Dramedy Examines Failure, Success Comedian Mike Birbiglia’s sophomore directorial effort Don’t Think Twice is a rather melancholy, ambitious rendering of the...

  • Outlaws and Angels | Review

    For a Few Hollers More: Mollner’s Retro Western a Few Cents Short on the Dollar Opening with Psalm 104:21, “They seek their meat from God,”...

  • The Infiltrator | Review

    Undercover Blues: Furman’s By-the-Numbers Thrills Enhanced by Cranston Certain performers manage an incalculable hook into material otherwise hampered by cliché and familiarity, something accomplished with...

  • Café Society | Review

    The Beautiful and the Consigned: Allen’s Latest Instance of Compromised Love Like all of Woody Allen’s features over the decades, his latest examination of humans...

  • Equals | Review

    Sweet Emotion: Doremus Does Dystopia on Enjoyable, Recognizable Canvas Emotions cannot be controlled, but they also cannot be allowed to control you. At least, that...

  • Private Property (1960) | Review

    Piece of the Pie: Stevens’ Psychosexual Drama Gets Revamped The poster tagline for Leslie Stevens’ 1960 directorial debut Private Property says it all, proclaiming the...

  • Carnage Park | Review

    Carnage Knowledge: Keating’s Halfhearted Shot at Grindhouse not a Fine Vintage For his fourth feature, indie genre director Mickey Keating attempts a vintage crime/horror mash-up...

  • The Neon Demon | Review

    Death Walks on High Heels: Refn Delves Daftly into the Los Angeles Fashion Demimonde To reference John Waters’ definition of beauty, “a face should jolt,...

  • Swiss Army Man | Review

    Pretend That We’re Dead: Or – Two Dans, a Dano, and a Dead Body What is there to be said about a dramatic comedy built...

  • Careful What You Wish For | Review

    Imitation of Life: Rosenbaum Bastes Noir Tropes in YA Sheen Director Elizabeth Allen Rosenbaum seems dangerously preoccupied with fashioning ill-suited screen personas for pop stars,...

  • The Fits | Review

    Get in Where You Fit In: Holmer’s Impressive Allegory of Assimilation Although it may feel a bit too allegorical or stylistically esoteric for its own...

  • Loving | 2016 Cannes Film Festival Review

    United States of Love: Nichols Falters with Hokey Prestige Picture In 1967, the United States Supreme Court made a landmark civil rights decision with Loving...

  • Last Days in the Desert | Review

    Just By Looking At It: Garcia’s Hollowed Jesus Flick At one time an adept purveyor of what could loosely be termed the modernized ‘women’s picture’...

  • Nina | Review

    A Matter of Resistance: Mort’s Compromised Portrait of a Musical Legend She may try with a considerable, ambitious might, but Zoe Saldana does not conjure...

  • A Hologram for the King | Review

    Same as it ever Was: Tykwer’s Unwieldy Intersection of Commerce and Culture We’ve seen an increasing amount of films featuring Americans floundering about in the...

  • The Meddler | Review

    Chapter Two: Scafaria Scores with Sarandon in Earnest Character Portrait Writer-director Lorene Scafaria manages her most accomplished work to date with sophomore feature, The Meddler,...

  • Hostile Border | Review

    Confessions of a Pocha Hustler: Dwyer Tackles Topicality with Listless Thriller Michael Dwyer makes his directorial debut with Hostile Border, an adequate examination of contemporary...

  • Criminal | Review

    The Iceman Cometh: Vromen Baffles with Illogical Romantic Thriller Director Ariel Vromen dashes the promise shown in his 2012 portrait of contract killer Richard Kuklinski...

  • Green Room | Review

    Music Lets the People Come Together: Saulnier’s Latest an Enjoyably Intense Thriller Director Jeremy Saulnier follows the promise of his 2013 breakout thriller Blue Ruin,...

  • One More Time | Review

    Begin Again: Edwards’ Satisfying Sophomore Film Utilizes Walken Thanks to the overwhelming trend of quirk, cliché, or contrivance evident in most American indie offerings (whether...

  • Louder Than Bombs | Review

    Another Time, Another Place: Trier’s Graceful, Quiet English Language Debut Norwegian director Joachim Trier reteams with his regular scribe Eskil Vogt for Louder Than Bombs,...

  • Darling | Review

    When She Calls You Sweetheart: Keating Invokes Femme Fou with Derivative Art-house Thriller Riding the thin line between copycatting and homage, indie director Mickey Keating...

  • Miles Ahead | Review

    Kinetic & Spirited: Debut Heavily Reliant on Cheadle’s Perf His raspy voice precedes, commanding the dark screen. Front and center, the unruly Don Cheadle channels the...

  • Hunter Gatherer | 2016 SXSW Film Festival Review

    Happy-Go-Lucky: Locy’s Odd, High-Spirited Portrait of a Scam Artist A mere glance at the extensive list of executive producers (which includes David Gordon Green, Jody...

  • Krisha | Review

    Turkey Shoot: Shults Brings Heartache to the Holidays in Intimate Debut We’ve seen it plenty of times before, the hellacious discomfort accompanying the enforced tradition...