All posts tagged "U.S. Indie Film Review"

  • Sicario | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    The Company of Wolves: Villeneuve’s Superb Packaging Enhances Customary Cartel Themes There’s much to be excited about with Sicario, the latest film from Quebecois director...

  • Louder Than Bombs | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    Another Time, Another Place: Trier’s Graceful, Quiet English Language Debut Norwegian director Joachim Trier reteams with his regular scribe Eskil Vogt for Louder Than Bombs,...

  • The Sea of Trees | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    The Forest for the Trees: Van Sant’s Melodramatic Misfire Gus Van Sant’s name seems to conjure wildly different reactions depending on how accustomed one is...

  • Carol | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

    Locked Out of Heaven: Haynes Delivers Chilly Lesbian Romance Todd Haynes makes an exciting return with Carol, his first feature film since 2007’s I’m Not...

  • Bessie | Review

    Lady Sings the Hues: Rees Returns to Resurrect the Star of Blues Singer Many may not be immediately familiar with the name Bessie Smith, an...

  • Every Secret Thing | Review

    Baby Blues: Berg’s Troubled and Troubling Feature Debut Treated to a chilly reception following its premiere at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival last spring, the...

  • I’ll See You in My Dreams | Review

    Dream a Little Dream of Me: Haley’s Superb Showcase for Blythe Danner Long a supporting fixture in a variety of film projects going on five...

  • Good Kill | Review

    Fatal Irony: Is There Anything Good About This Kill? Nearly two decades after collaborating on the shrewd and subtly realized sci-fi allegory, Gattaca, Ethan Hawke...

  • Bravetown | Review

    Home of the Brave: Duran’s Debut a Neutered Examination of Grief During Wartime There’s a war going on, though not one specifically referenced, mentioned or...

  • Ride | Review

    Ride of Passage: Hunt’s Belated Sophomore Effort Crests Waves of Cliché Perhaps the most surprising element of note in Helen Hunt’s Ride is the fact...

  • Welcome to Me | Review

    Broadcast Blues: Wiig’s Amusing Portrait of Mental Illness Mental illness collides with reality TV inspired media for Shira Piven’s generally pleasurable oddity, Welcome to Me,...

  • River of Fundament | Review

    All that Glitters: Barney’s Operatic, Caterwauling Art-house Epic Those familiar with the work of Matthew Barney, namely his impressive Cremaster Cycle (2003) and Drawing Restraint...

  • Blackbird | Review

    The Boys in the Choir: Polk’s Antiquated Rendition of the Rural Gay Narrative The blatant underrepresentation of black gay characters in film, whatever letter they’re...

  • Just Before I Go | Review

    Drop in the Bucket: Cox’s Uneven Directorial Debut Actress Courtney Cox makes her directorial debut with Just Before I Go, based on the first feature...

  • Alex of Venice | Review

    Touch of Venice: Messina’s Understated, Observational Debut There’s much to admire in actor Chris Messina’s assured, astutely observed directorial debut, Alex of Venice. Namely its...

  • The Reconstruction of William Zero | Review

    Less Than Zero: Bush’s Blend is a Well-intended but Exhaustive Piece Drama stimulated by an identity crisis set against a science fiction backdrop poses for...

  • Roar (1981) | Review

    We Bought a Zoo: Marshall’s Early Eighties Oddity Resurrected In the annals of cinema, there are very few examples of entire film productions resulting in...

  • True Story | Review

    The Killer Beside Me: Goold’s Debut Warps Grisly Headline into Funereal Pallor The rapidly fluctuating career of James Franco got a dramatic jumpstart with a...

  • Broken Horses | Review

    Goodbye Horses: Chopra’s Nonsensical English Language Debut The point of Bollywood director Vidhu Vinod Chopra’s English debut Broken Horses seems lost, along with a whole...

  • Farah Goes Bang | Review

    Impeach My Bush: Menon’s Debut a Spirited Period Road Trip Exploring a provocative dark chapter in the voting tendencies of the United States general public...

  • The Harvest | Review

    Harvest Home: McNaughton’s Return Yields Blighted Crop Fans of director John McNaughton, known for his gruesome cult classic Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1990),...

  • Boychoir | Review

    The Angels’ Share: Girard’s Musical Drama a Conventional Return Quebecois filmmaker Francois Girard returns from a near decade long hiatus with Boychoir, his first cinematic...

  • Cut Bank | Review

    The Postman Always Dies Twice: Shakman’s Noir Infused Debut Underwhelms Seasoned television director Matt Shakman (“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”) makes his narrative feature debut...

  • 5 to 7 | Review

    Love in the Afternoon: Levin’s Gallic Flavored Romantic Drama Lacks Sense of Amour Fou Writer and producer Victor Levin makes a patiently observed portrait of...

  • The Girl is in Trouble | Review

    Trouble in Mind: Onah’s Homage to Neo Noir an Indie Echo of Device In development for the past five years since it was initially announced,...