All posts tagged "U.S. Indie Film Review"

  • Summer of Blood | Review

    Hemogobble: Turkel’s Latest Assay into Misanthropy Indie filmmaker Onor Turkel seems determined to remain hilariously unlikeable as his self-effacing, self-directed on-screen alter ego with his...

  • Default | Review

    Piracy Politique: Brand Uses Topical Subject for Common Critique Colombian born filmmaker Simon Brand cashes in on the current fascination with hijacking pirates for his...

  • Birdman | Review

    Bullets Over Broadway: Inarritu’s Vibrant, Exuberant Portrait Of Celebrity, Relevance, and Creative Passion Not only is Birdman (or The Virtue of Ignorance) arguably the best...

  • Young Ones | Review

    Young at Heart: Paltrow’s Sci-Fi Western is All Dried Up Dystopic draught heralds the end of times for the parable that serves as Jake Paltrow’s...

  • Listen Up Philip | Review

    Philip A. Dick: Perry’s Literary Minds Stuck In a Lonely Place Following up his dark hearted homage to road trip cinema with 2011’s The Color...

  • The Pact II | Review

    Murky Contract Part Deux: Hallam & Horvath Continue to Stir a Slushy Cauldron A vaguely administered narrative continues to plague the concept of what comprises...

  • Addicted | Review

    A Dirty Shame: Woodruff’s Erotic Fiction Adaptation Flatlines Demurely arriving before the anticipated film version of E.L. James’ erotic fiction nonsense Fifty Shades of Grey...

  • Wild | 2014 TIFF Review

    Peaks and Vallée: Witherspoon Eats, Prays, Hikes When Cheryl Strayed’s memoir was released in 2012, the climate for gender politics was different. The book’s popularity soared...

  • You’re Not You | Review

    You-Hoo: Wolfe’s ALS Drama Tries To Balance Sentiment With Schmaltz Hilary Swank seems attracted to playing daunted heroines, continually up against considerable odds—the homophobic rednecks...

  • St. Vincent | Review

    Sinners And Saints: Melfi’s Debut an Unobtrusive Crowd Pleaser For a few moments during its initial set-up, Theodore Melfi’s directorial debut, St. Vincent, seems on...

  • Kill the Messenger | Review

    Crack is Whack: Cuesta Revisits Contras Affair as Political Thriller Though he has several films under his belt, director Michael Cuesta has probably made more...

  • Stephen King’s A Good Marriage | Review

    Golden Years: Askin Adapts Stephen King’s Domestic Dilemma For those hoping for resurgence in the quality of Stephen King stock, the unique promise of A...

  • Left Behind | Review

    Growing Pains: Armstrong’s Re-hash of Christian Agenda Hardly Rapturous The end of times is here again with Left Behind, heralded by the presence of Nicolas...

  • Rosewater | 2014 TIFF Review

    Solitary Confinement Is Boring: Stewart’s Adaptation Of Bahari’s Lengthy Detainment is a Slick, Tame Affair Jon Stewart’s first foray into the fictional film arena is...

  • Hellaware | Review

    Satirize This: Bilandic’s Scruffy Send-up of NYC Art Scene Though starting off on a stronger note than where it eventually ends up, Michael M. Bilandic’s...

  • Cold in July | Blu-ray Review

    Director Jim Mickle’s fourth feature film, Cold in July, is an adaptation of a novel by Joe R. Landsale, set in the particular, simpler landscape...

  • Men, Women & Children | Review

    I Tumblr For You; The Kids Aren’t Alright in Reitman’s Latest Parents and their burgeoning teenagers battle their insecurities and repressed sexuality amidst ever present technology...

  • Days and Nights | Review

    Birds of a Feather: Camargo’s Debut a Tepid Chekhovian Transplant Contemporizing classic literature can be a tricky feat, though it more often than not seems...

  • Jimi: All is By My Side | Review

    Before the Haze: Ridley’s Nuanced Portrait Worthy of Legendary Subject After a rather cool reception following high profile festival play at Toronto and SXSW, John...

  • Two Night Stand | Review

    About Last Night: Nichols’ Debut Paddles Vainly Around Notions of Modern Love Director Max Nichols makes his directorial debut with Two Night Stand, almost entirely...

  • Heaven Knows What | 2014 TIFF Review

    Living Through Oblivion: Safdie Bros. Lens Devastating Tale of Desperation and Depravity on the Streets of NYC The story of how the directorial brothers Benny...

  • Good People | Review

    People Are People: Genz’s English Debut a Satisfactory B-Grade Noir Expectations may a bet set a bit too high for Danish filmmaker Henrik Ruben Genz’s...

  • Ned Rifle | 2014 TIFF Review

    Nobody’s Fool: Hartley Concludes His Grim Trilogy While it may be wholly unnecessary to see the two preceding films in the loosely knit Grim trilogy...

  • 99 Homes | 2014 TIFF Review

    Housing Complex: Bahrani Extends Capitalism Criticism to Housing Market Though his 2012 farming melodrama At Any Price found director Ramin Bahrani gaining wider visibility with...

  • Still Alice | 2014 TIFF Review

    Red Queen’s Lost Her Head: Westmoreland & Glatzer’s Poetic Elegy of Familial Tragedy It’s been a busy year for Julianne Moore, in between tent pole...