All posts tagged "U.S. Indie Film Review"

  • Rosewater | 2014 TIFF Review

    Solitary Confinement Is Boring: Stewart’s Adaptation Of Bahari’s Lengthy Detainment is a Slick, Tame Affair Jon Stewart’s first foray into the fictional film arena is...

  • Hellaware | Review

    Satirize This: Bilandic’s Scruffy Send-up of NYC Art Scene Though starting off on a stronger note than where it eventually ends up, Michael M. Bilandic’s...

  • Cold in July | Blu-ray Review

    Director Jim Mickle’s fourth feature film, Cold in July, is an adaptation of a novel by Joe R. Landsale, set in the particular, simpler landscape...

  • Men, Women & Children | Review

    I Tumblr For You; The Kids Aren’t Alright in Reitman’s Latest Parents and their burgeoning teenagers battle their insecurities and repressed sexuality amidst ever present technology...

  • Days and Nights | Review

    Birds of a Feather: Camargo’s Debut a Tepid Chekhovian Transplant Contemporizing classic literature can be a tricky feat, though it more often than not seems...

  • Jimi: All is By My Side | Review

    Before the Haze: Ridley’s Nuanced Portrait Worthy of Legendary Subject After a rather cool reception following high profile festival play at Toronto and SXSW, John...

  • Two Night Stand | Review

    About Last Night: Nichols’ Debut Paddles Vainly Around Notions of Modern Love Director Max Nichols makes his directorial debut with Two Night Stand, almost entirely...

  • Heaven Knows What | 2014 TIFF Review

    Living Through Oblivion: Safdie Bros. Lens Devastating Tale of Desperation and Depravity on the Streets of NYC The story of how the directorial brothers Benny...

  • Good People | Review

    People Are People: Genz’s English Debut a Satisfactory B-Grade Noir Expectations may a bet set a bit too high for Danish filmmaker Henrik Ruben Genz’s...

  • Ned Rifle | 2014 TIFF Review

    Nobody’s Fool: Hartley Concludes His Grim Trilogy While it may be wholly unnecessary to see the two preceding films in the loosely knit Grim trilogy...

  • 99 Homes | 2014 TIFF Review

    Housing Complex: Bahrani Extends Capitalism Criticism to Housing Market Though his 2012 farming melodrama At Any Price found director Ramin Bahrani gaining wider visibility with...

  • Still Alice | 2014 TIFF Review

    Red Queen’s Lost Her Head: Westmoreland & Glatzer’s Poetic Elegy of Familial Tragedy It’s been a busy year for Julianne Moore, in between tent pole...

  • Space Station 76 | Review

    Earth Below Us: Plotnick’s Debut a Sweet Space Soap Opera Those familiar with the comedic genius of Jack Plotnick should be thrilled to see his...

  • The Guest | Review

    Lone Survivor: Wingard’s Latest a Near Perfect Mix of Subtext, Comedy and Satisfying Thrills After contributing to several anthology films, including the V/H/S films and...

  • Tusk | 2014 TIFF Review

    Another Tuskegee Experiment: Smith’s Latest Creation Odd But Not Audacious Sure to garner all the WTF exclamatory delights that it’s had its grotesque little heart...

  • Manglehorn | 2014 TIFF Review

    Locks of Love: Pacino Engrosses in Slight Narrative from Green David Gordon Green continues his examination of masculine relationships in Manglehorn, an adaptation from first...

  • Kelly & Cal | Review

    Shared Tendencies: McGowan’s Debut an Understated Navigation of Character While she’s not treading uncharted territories with her directorial debut, Kelly & Cal, Jen McGowan manages...

  • While We’re Young | 2014 TIFF Review

    Confessions of an Aging Artist: Baumbach Humorously Reflects on Filmmaking Ethics and Middle Age In some ways the complimentary antithesis to his last work of...

  • At the Devil’s Door | Review

    Devil in Disguise: McCarthy’s Latest an Unnerving Indie Horror Film Every now and then, a horror film comes along that’s reminiscent of a certain heyday...

  • Nightcrawler | 2014 TIFF Review

    While the City Sleeps: Gyllenhaal Gets His Money Shot in Gilroy’s Debut You’ll be hard pressed to find a more enjoyably witty criticism of modern...

  • Honeymoon | Review

    Period of Adjustment: Janiak’s Eerie Relationship Chiller a Provocative Debut Weirdly unsettling, Leigh Janiak’s directorial debut, Honeymoon, is one of those rarely effective offbeat psychological...

  • My Old Lady | 2014 TIFF Review

    Seeds of Yesterday: Horovitz’s Debut a Tonally Uncomfortable Adaptation Playwright and screenwriter Israel Horovitz makes his directorial debut with My Old Lady, an adaptation of...

  • Memphis | Review

    Riding on a Western Dream: Sutton’s Sophomore Film Drifts About a Drifter To refer to Tim Sutton’s sophomore film, Memphis as understated would itself be...

  • The Longest Week | Review

    Arrested Development: Glanz’s Debut an Affluent Vacuum For the most part, it’s an ingenious trick to fabricate an aura of empathy around a pool of...

  • The Scribbler | Review

    I’m Scribbling as Fast as I Can: Suits Unsuited for Comic Book Adaptation Within minutes of its meager running time, which opens with a disorienting...